NOVEMBER 3 MSCC STAR OF THE WEEK: ’54 GMC-THIS IS WHAT A REAL TOW TRUCK LOOKS LIKE

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03-imgp6495-001NOVEMBER 3 MSCC STAR OF THE WEEK: ’54 GMC-THIS IS WHAT A  REAL TOW TRUCK  LOOKS LIKE

Tow trucks have evolved over the years from Model T’s with hand cranks to modern ramp trucks that effortlessly pickup and haul stranded cars with minimum effort.

Tow truck design paralleled the advances in automotive technology so a gentle ride on a ramp was infinitely preferable to a tow hook.

Things like front-wheel drive cars and giant pickups changed the game in a big way.

Back in 1954 if you got stranded or stuck in your car you were looking at a serious hike to town for help and when it did come the truck looked like this MSCC Star of the Week.

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They were pretty basic and crude by 2013 standards but back in 1954 this GMC was like the cavalry coming over the hill. Trevor Comfort owns this brute and he’s a guy who works on a lot of classic iron in his restoration shop.

A classic tow truck was a natural fit for a guy who lives, breathes and works in the past.

 

NOVEMBER 2 MSCC STAR OF THE DAY: CORVETTE STING RAY-THIS IS THE VIEW MOST GUYS HAD

02-imgp5544-001The Corvette is an automotive icon that spans decades. The key to success for the Vette has always been to lead, rather than follow.

Corvettes led in 1953 when they became the first two-seater sports car on this side of the Atlantic.

They led again when they produced the 2nd Gen Sting Ray in 1963 with a car that defined cutting-edge styling in an era that saw automotive evolution every year.

The split-window Sting Ray led the charge.

After that the Corvette mission was simple-dominate in every way.

That’s why this MSCC Star of the Day Vette on the road back in September symbolizes the view most guys had of a Sting Ray back in the 60s.

 

NOVEMBER 1 MSCC STAR OF THE DAY: ’63 PLYMOUTH 426 MAX WEDGE-BIG, BAD AND BLUE

01-my star imgp2003-002Don’t let the light blue color on this ’63 Plymouth fool you – it looks passive but this is a 426 cubic Max Wedge Mopar.

Max Wedges were born to run. They’d show up at the track and the air would go out of the competition every time one of these Mopar monsters would fire up.

The Ramchargers made the Max Wedge famous in the 60s because they went out and broke the will of anyone unlucky enough to meet one at the track.

This MSCC Star of the Day was at a show back in September 2008-nobody noticed this unassuming-looking Plymouth until it fired up.

That’s how it worked with Max Wedges.

OCTOBER 31 MSCC STAR OF THE DAY: A HEARSE…BECAUSE A CUTE LITTLE RED VW BEETLE MADE NO SENSE

imgp1030-001Halloween really narrows down the selection for MSCC Star of the Day because a cute little red Beetle convertible just doesn’t fit the mood.

This is a day for hearses and skeletons not terminally cute cars so Minis, Metropolitans and Isettas are far too cheery.

This Halloween MSCC Star of the Day old hearse really fit the mood even though the picture was taken back in June on a nice sunny day.

Happy Halloween.

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OCTOBER 30 MSCC STAR OF THE DAY:1946 DODGE COE TWO TON-THE COOLEST WAY TO HAUL A TRACTOR

The COE was built for the serious loads back in the 1940s. The “cab over engine” configuration was a significant advantage for load lengths in big COEs and payloads in smaller COEs.

This MSCC Star of the Day 1946 Dodge COE was a good example of this advantage at an auction back in September because that’s a pretty big tractor stuffed in the back.

The interest in COEs has exploded in recent years because peoople are beginning to realize two things.

1-You can plunk a giant engine anywhere you want in these brutes.
2-They’re the coolest trucks on the planet.

 

OCTOBER 29 STAR OF THE DAY: MODEL T MAGIC-YOU HAVE TO LOOK BACK TO LOOK AHEAD

oct29-aimgp0563-001This picture was taken back in 2010 but the concept of the Model T goes back a full century before that.

This row of Model Ts is a classic example of why these mass produced workhorses were so important to the economy of North America and the world.

They were cheap and incredibly versatile because they could be farm tractors, trucks, school buses, delivery vans, saw mills and passenger cars.

That’s the kind of thinking that made Henry Ford one of the biggest names in the 20th century and it set off a chain reaction of advanced technology the next eighty years.

That’s an MSCC Star of the Day feat.

OCTOBER 28 MSCC STAR OF THE DAY: 1952 PLYMOUTH CRANBROOK-BEFORE THE ROAD RUNNER DAYS

oct28-imgp4994-001Plymouth didn’t begin in 1968 with the Road Runner. There was a point long before the muscle car era began called the “practical family car” era.

Plymouth lived right in the middle of this affordable car market since inception back in 1928.

Despite the association with the pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, the name Plymouth actually came from a reliable form of binder twine.

This MSCC Star of the Day 1952 Plymouth was at a show back in July 2012 and it was a typical example of what Plymouth was all about for decades.

This is a basic sedan with basic equipment and a reputation for reliability.

It wasn’t a Road Runner but it was everything a family needed in 1952.

For past MSCC Stars of the Day please follow this link.

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Star of the Day page sponsored by Southside Dodge.

 

 

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